A Month for Baldr – X – Offerings

As far as historical offerings go, I have no idea. There isn’t much evidence of a wide worship of Baldr (yet, so until we find something incredible, or we travel back in time, we really won’t know), so all I have is what is between the two of u/Us, and the little bits and pieces around the interwebs from His other people (though once again, there really aren’t that many, and it seems like most of them have either a peripheral, or a very private relationship with Him).

For me, I offer the obvious chamomile tea, usually with honey. I typically end up having tea with Him, enjoying my own cup as He enjoys His. I offer a few hours of candle burning (one of Beth’s Balder candles right now) on Sundays, as well as try to spend more time than usual with Him that day, although I think it may have to be a different day as the household’s schedule has been shifting, and weekends have become busier.
I also try to go out in nature or my garden and enjoy the beauty found there, I always feel Him around emphatically when I’m out in the wide wide. Honestly, I don’ think there is much that Baldr would say no to when offering to Him. I feel He really enjoys when we ourselves find joy in life, appreciating each moment for what it is and what it brings us; basically trying to live in the moment.

Oregano

From wikipedia.org

From wikipedia.org

Latin Name: Organum vulgare

Common/Folk Names: Kekik (Turkish), wild marjoram, winter marjoram, Mediterranean oregano, Mexican oregano, mountain mint, wintersweet

 

From FoodUniversity.com

From FoodUniversity.com

Medicinal Uses:
It has been shown to be most likely effective for riding oneself of intestinal parasites.

Oregano has proven to be high in antioxidants, and in tests, it has shown antimicrobial activity against certain strains of listeria.

In traditional Austrian medicine, oregano consumed as a tea or used topically as an ointment  is used to treat respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, and nervous system disorders. This hearkens back to Hippocrates’ use of oregano as a cure for stomach and respiratory ailments, along with use as an antiseptic.

From homegarden-journal.com

From homegarden-journal.com

Magical Uses:

Ruled by the planet Venus, the element of Air, and associated with Aphrodite.

Work with it for luck, happiness, tranquility, health, and protection. It can aid you in letting go of a loved one, or deepen existing love.

A crown of oregano worn during handfastings will bring happiness to the partnership. If also worn on the head whilst sleeping, it is said it will aid in psychic dreaming.

Because of oregano’s ability to bring joy, work with it to celebrate joyful occasions, or to bring more joy into your life. Wreaths or bundles of oregano can be left upon the recently deceased’s grave to ensure they find joy in the next part of their journey.

Of course, with all culinary herbs, use it in your food to impart the joy and happiness of oregano to your friends and family. Being easily recognizable as an important ingredient in Greek and Italian cuisine, it conjures up images of large family dinners, all are laughing and telling stories to each other, enjoying each other’s company. Keep these images in mind as you stir that pot of spiced tomato sauce, or as you mix together that olive oil, lemon juice, and oregano dressing.

The Month of The Vine

Image from Wikipedia

Celtic Name: Muin

Latin Name: Vitis (along with another name depending on the variety)

Dates: September 2-29

Parts Used: Grapes, leaves, wood, juice, seeds.

Medicinal Qualities:
Grape sugar is different from other sugars chemically; it doesn’t need the saliva to enter circulation within the body. This means that there is a fattening and warming action that aids with restoring energy and repair after the effects of fevers have taken hold, however, this action is not suitable for gout or inflammation.
Grapes in the diet also aid in anemia when eaten daily.

The leaves and seeds are an astringent. The leaves were used previously to stop bleeding and hemorrhaging. The leaves are used today dried and powdered and used on cattle to cure dysentery.

Image from Botanical.com

Magickal Qualities:
As the month the vine presides over (September) is a time of harvest, it makes sense that the vine is worked with in magic for harvesting, whether it is physical or spiritual. It has both masculine and feminine qualities. You can work with the vine for magics of joy, faerie workings, excitement, spiritual initiations, sacred knowledge, rebirth.
It increases fertility: placing a wreath above your bed aids in becoming pregnant, and on your child’s first birthday, hanging vines around the house ensures a long, fruitful life.
It is a wonderful tree to work with for all sorts of fertility, abundance, prosperity, money, happiness, and a sense of ease in life.
We musn’t forget that grapes are turned into wonderful, delicious wine. Wine is used to aid in connecting to the Otherworld, breaking down the barriers our minds put up around us. Though, each person reacts differently to different mind-altering substances, so it may work well for one, but not another. Wine is used to celebrate, to lose ourselves to revelry and our more primal selves concerned with our own happiness and pleasure.

Image from Wikipedia

 

I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud

I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the Milky Way,
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay;
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced; but they
Outdid the sparkling waves in glee;
A poet could not but be gay,
In such a jocund company;
I gazed – and gazed – but little thought
What wealth the show to me had brought:

For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood,
They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

-William Woordsworth

Sources:

  • Image: Bobbie Burgers