Month of the Ash

Latin Name
Fraxinus

Celtic Name
Nion

Common Names
Ash, Common Ash, Guardian Tree, Unicorn Tree

Dates
February 18 – March 17

Constituents
The bark contains amygdalin, has a bitter taste, but no odour. Is astringent.

Before the fruits are ripe, they contain tartaric acid, and after ripening, two sugars: sorbin and sorbit. The latter sugar occurs after fermentation. They also contain parasorbic acid.

The seeds are 22% oil, which is claimed to have killed a child by prussic acid poisoning.

Medicinal Usage
To ease diarrhoea, a decoction of the bark is taken. The same decoction can be used for leucorrhoea (white discharge that signals infection in the vagina) by injecting it into the vaginal canal.
To make use of the astringent quality of the berries, a gargle can be made to help sore throats and inflamed tonsils.
An infusion of Ash berries aids with heamorrhoids and strangury (painful urination that comes out in drops caused by spasms in the urethra or bladder).
Lastly, they are used to be rid of scurvy.

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Associations
Odin, Yggdrasil, World Tree, divination, Lugh, masculine, Fire, Sun, Bel, Lir, Manannan

Magical Uses
Wands made of Ash are good for general use, and in particular, healing and magics of the Sun.

For luck and fortune, carry a leaf in your pocket. However, although it is a lucky and protective tree, one can find themselves incurring the wrath of the tree if one causes harm a tree.

To be rid of skin conditions such as warts, carry a pin on you (a safety pin would be, well, safe), for three days, then on the third day, the pin is driven into the bark of an Ash tree, where the tree would then gain a knob, and you would be left with healthy skin.

Babes in the British Isles would be fed a spoonful of Ash sap before leaving mother’s bed for the first time as it was thought to prevent childhood illness, disease, and death.
The berries of the tree would also be placed in the cribs of babes to ward of Fae Folk from taking the child as a changeling.

In Northern Britain, young maidens would place the leaves of an Ash tree under their pillows to receive prophetic dreams about the men they would marry.

As it is seen as the World Tree by the Druids, staves would be made of the branches of the tree, so as to have a portable World Tree wherever they may be.

 

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